Sunday, February 21, 2016

How To Get Into The Top Of A Bernina 930

There are two spring-loaded screws on the top of the machine.  One on the right (under the bobbin winder lid), and one on the left (built into the bobbin winder tensioner).  Push down, then turn a quarter of a turn.  You'll know you're in the right position if the screw pops up.



Once you get inside, you can clean and oil, and adjust the presser foot tension.  Here's where that adjustment is.


The copper colored cylinders are the basting mechanism.  Be sure to use this feature every-once-in-a-while, so it doesn't freeze-up.

10 comments:

  1. Your blogs and every other content are thus interesting and helpful it makes me return back again.
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  2. Its really very interesting and informative one,thanks for sharing this blog,keep updating more threads Best Embroidery Sewing Machines in Chennai

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I agree with you. I'll ask my wife to go through this article and hope it resolves her problem. Best Sewing Machine for Beginners

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. Being here is fruitful, I'm gonna share this to all employees of my company. our company is Sama Engineering which is bakery items making machines manufacturer. Packing machine

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  5. How can you repair a pfaff 74 when there is a one piece housing around it?

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  6. Hi Dolores,

    On the old Pfaffs, you can remove the plastic part that the spool pins are on. I don’t have a good picture of the back, so I’m going by other model Pfaffs that I’ve worked on. Usually there’s one screw, then you slide it to the take-up end to get it off of the internal screw. Unscrew the screws on the needle plate, and remove that. You can also remove the end cap (on the left) to get to the take-up area. On some old Pfaffs, there’s a lever under the end cap that releases it. Or, they simply pull off. Then tip it up to get to the bottom on that particular machine –since it’s a flat bed. The old Pfaffs are notorious for freezing-up. WD-40 is the easiest way to break-up the old oil and get it moving again. Here’s a link about using WD-40 on sewing machines. It’s something we use at the shop every day.

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  7. Hi, I was looking for your email but wasn't able to find it. Do you have any info on timing the 930? My husband and I do sewing machine but just started about 1 1/2 yrs ago and this machine seems to be tricky.

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  8. Timing is something I don't want just anyone to play with. You can really scramble your machine, sometimes beyond repair. So I gave my reply to Katie privately, because she and her husband are sewing machine mechanics. Adjusting timing settings is something I'm very cautious about posting on my blog.

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  9. Annette, I'm here at your blog and thanking you, again! This will be fun to read through. I, too was always mechanically inclined and like tinkering with machines...Gratitude to you! Sandy

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